Contact mike@herefordfungi.org or phone 07507 266711 © HFSG 2018
Lycoperdon perlatum - The Common Puffball Hygrocybe coccinea - The Scarlet Waxcap Geastrum triplex - The Collared Earthstar
   
About Us Fungal forays, the search for fungi in the field, first started in Herefordshire in 1868 - see History . We carry on that tradition through a programme of around 13 forays each year (from March to December) in a range of habitats, from woodlands to grasslands. If you would like to join us, you would be most welcome. Contact our Secretary, Mike Stroud mike@herefordfungi.org or phone 01874 730263. Our primary aim is to record fungi throughout Herefordshire. Records are sent to the National and County databases, giving the location and date on which a species was collected and, in many cases, associated plants or substrates. These records may enable ecologists to detect changes in the frequency and distribution of species, including monitoring the spread of a newly introduced fungus or the decline of a formerly abundant one. Such data contributes to our knowledge of the effects of climate change.
Workshop Ascobolus spores Fuligo septica - Flowers of Tan
Herefordshire Fungus Survey Group
Geastrum triplex - The Collared Earthstar
Contact mike@herefordfungi.org or phone 07507 266711 © HFSG 2018
Lycoperdon perlatum - Common Puffball Hygrocybe coccinea - Scarlet Waxcap Geastrum triplex - Collared Earthstar
About Us Fungal forays, the search for fungi in the field, first started in Herefordshire in 1868 - see History . We carry on that tradition through a programme of around 13 forays each year (from March to December) in a range of habitats, from woodlands to grasslands. If you would like to join us, you would be most welcome. Contact our Secretary, Mike Stroud mike@herefordfungi.org or phone 01874 730263. Our primary aim is to record fungi throughout Herefordshire. Records are sent to the National and County databases, giving the location and date on which a species was collected and, in many cases, associated plants or substrates. These records may enable ecologists to detect changes in the frequency and distribution of species, including monitoring the spread of a newly introduced fungus or the decline of a formerly abundant one. Such data contributes to our knowledge of the effects of climate change. Contact us
Herefordshire Fungus Survey Group